-American writer and blogger Liz Petrone posted a picture of her young son’s little wrist with a tiny heart drawn on it that served to reassure him it’s gonna be okay. -Louise Mallet from Britain comforted her son and drew one heart on his palm and another on hers. They then decided that if one of them presses the heart, it'll send a hug to the other. -It's comforting to know that you can look at your wrist to remind yourself that there's somebody in your life who really loves and cares about you. -Try to calm your kid down by taking some deep breaths together. This will undo that initial nervous system response. -Create a “worry character” together with your child and give it a name. Have your young one talk to this character so that when your child calms it down, he’ll relax a little bit too. -At the end of each day, take 10 to 20 minutes for the “Worry Time” ritual, when your child can fully express all the worries and fears he or she had during the day. -Whether it be relationship issues, anxiety, depression, problems at work, or personal insecurities, you can use Liz Petrone’s approach to feel better.

You’ve probably seen those posts on social media showing pictures of children with little hearts drawn on their wrists. In case you wanted to find out the meaning of those doodles, this video is just for you. Prepare to see something really sweet and touching and sending an important message on how to protect and support your child.
Liz Petrone spoke about her son Luca’s struggles with severe anxiety. One day the worried boy burst into tears when he got on the school bus. And although Liz tried to comfort him from the outside as much as she could, it didn’t help. So the next morning she decided to give her son a “gift” to make him feel better. She gave him a peck on the hand and drew a heart on the place she’d kissed. The boy would look down at the heart and know that he’s loved and that everything’s gonna be okay.
If your child suffers from anxiety, there are a couple of things you can do to provide emotional support for them. First of all, reassuring your little one that everything’s alright isn’t always the best idea. When you’re anxious, you desperately want to believe that there’s nothing to worry about, but your brain won’t let you. Tell your kids that you understand how scary it is and that you’ll be by their side until it’s okay again, when they’re feeling better.
Create a “worry character” together with your child and give it a name. While you’re doing this, let your son or daughter describe the character in detail, for instance, when it appears the most, how it behaves, how it feels, or when it goes away. This will let you find out more about how your child’s really feeling and coping.

-American writer and blogger Liz Petrone posted a picture of her young son’s little wrist with a tiny heart drawn on it that served to reassure him it’s gonna be okay.
-Louise Mallet from Britain comforted her son and drew one heart on his palm and another on hers. They then decided that if one of them presses the heart, it’ll send a hug to the other.
-It’s comforting to know that you can look at your wrist to remind yourself that there’s somebody in your life who really loves and cares about you.
-Try to calm your kid down by taking some deep breaths together. This will undo that initial nervous system response.
-Create a “worry character” together with your child and give it a name. Have your young one talk to this character so that when your child calms it down, he’ll relax a little bit too.
-At the end of each day, take 10 to 20 minutes for the “Worry Time” ritual, when your child can fully express all the worries and fears he or she had during the day.
-Whether it be relationship issues, anxiety, depression, problems at work, or personal insecurities, you can use Liz Petrone’s approach to feel better.

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