Scientists Have Found a New Continent on Earth

The Greek philosopher Plato first described Atlantis in the year 360 BC. Ever since people have been enamored with this lost continent. What happened to it? What was it like? Did they eat cheeseburgers? Did Atlantis ever even exist at all?

Unfortunately, the answer to that last question is probably no.
Still, there might be some hope, as geologists stumble across lost continents more often than you might think. Here are three sunken lands that might hold you over until the fish people turn up.

  • All of the Earth’s landmass was once combined into a single massive supercontinent known as Pangea. About two hundred million years ago the continent split in two.
  • The continental plate might have been roughly the size of Greenland, King of the Islands, but was actually divided into several smaller landmasses, similar to the Caribbean.
  • Greater Adria would’ve been a vast collection of islands and coral atolls separated by shallow and warm tropical seas.
  • Most of it sank into the Earth’s Mantle following a collision with mainland Europe not long after its formation.
  • Finding this sunken landmass was no easy feat, and took years of research by geologists from multiple countries. You see, southern Europe is what experts refer to as “a mess.”
  • Aspiring geologists looking for another lost world might turn their attention to the South Pacific, and the unassuming island nation of New Zealand.
  • New Zealand, like many islands, is little more than the top of a vast underwater mountain range.
  • Zealandia is believed to have broken away from Australia around sixty to eighty-five million years ago.
  • Zealandia is more than half the size of its parent continent and much larger than Greater Adria.
  • Fossil records even indicate that there may have been animals on the continent before it was swallowed up by the rising Pacific Ocean at the end of the last ice age.
  • If Zealandia were above water, it would interrupt the EAC, hogging all that tropical warmth for itself like the greedy landmass it is.
  • What differentiates Doggerland from the first two entries on this list is that it existed recently enough for humans to have set foot on this lost land.
  • It’s named after Dogger Bank, a submerged plateau halfway between England and Denmark.
  • Modern humans are known to have begun inhabiting the region between the years of 10,000 and 4,000BC, as evidenced by the discovery of flint and bone tools on the floor of the English Channel.
  • As with all good things, Doggerland eventually came to an end. And as with Zealandia, it was receding glaciers and rising sea levels that did this landmass in.

#continents#geography

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here