Cramped space, noise, annoying fellow passengers… That’s what a typical flight looks like. But what if you had the whole plane just for yourself? Before you say that it’s possible only for rich people who fly private jets, just listen to this…

Sometimes airlines have to operate commercial flights with only one (in some cases 2 or 3) passenger. As you can guess, these lucky guys get a first-class experience for the price of an economy ticket. But why would airlines do so? Don’t such flights just make them lose money and it would be more logical to cancel them? Well, when they make a decision to fly an nearly empty plane, they have to take into consideration much more than headcount.

-Most planes don’t just fly back and forth between two airports. An empty plane could rush from airport A to airport B where a full house of passengers is waiting to get to airport C by dinner.

-Airline crews use empty planes to reposition crew workers to the places where they’re needed.

-Maintenance is performed at pre-planned intervals, and a plane has to be at the right place and time. So canceling a flight just because it’s lightly booked can disrupt this intricate web.

-If the flight is under-booked, the cargo holds can be full.

-Airlines offer lower prices only for early bird seats. If they suddenly started selling cheaper tickets right before the departure just to fill an empty plane, it would compromise the proven pricing model.

-You have to fly 95 times and somewhere between your flight #96 and #100 you might hit the jackpot.

-If you see that the row you chose during booking looks full right before online check-in opens, make a switch to one that looks like it may be empty.

-Pick aisle and window seats when traveling with someone leaving the middle one vacant and hope that no one will choose it.

-On a freshly introduced route or a new airline having a lighter passenger load is highly likely since it usually takes some time for customers to grab those seats.

-Packed planes are a typical thing for mega-hubs while smaller airports don’t get sold-outs.

-In 2016, passengers on a Mexican flight noticed a green snake hanging from the overhead compartment.

-The flight from New York to Sydney takes 19 hours and 16 minutes.

-In 2018, a plane was taking off from Yakutsk in Russia when cargo made up of gold bars, gems, and precious metals started falling out right on the runway.

-In the Orkney Islands in Scotland, there are two airports, Westray and Papa Westray connected by a 2-minute flight.

-It takes only 8 minutes to get from St. Gallen-Altenrhein in Switzerland to Friedrichshafen in Germany.

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