Remember that nervous feeling on report card day as a kid? You spend all day with a racing mind wondering what grades you got. Straight As? Some Bs? Will Mom and Dad be mad about Cs and Ds? Or did I get any Fs?? Hold on…why isn’t there a grade E??

Well, the short answer is that F simply stands for “failure” on the grading scale since “failure” begins with the letter F. Teachers didn’t want E to be interpreted as “excellent” beyond primary school, as percentages come in when you’re in middle school, high school, and college. Poor lonely E!

-F simply stands for “failure” on the grading scale since “failure” begins with the letter F. Teachers didn’t want E to be interpreted as “excellent” beyond primary school, as percentages come in when you’re in middle school, high school, and college.

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-The first school to use a grading scale model similar to our modern one was a school in Massachusetts called Mount Holyoke College, an all-women’s university. In 1887, their scale went from A to E.

-The Standard Measurement System is still taught in schools, while the rest of the world uses the Metric System.

-Only about 20% of U.S. primary, junior, and high schools require uniforms.

-The U.S. school system starts with preschool, then kindergarten at the age of 5 and lasts till 12th grade at age 17 or 18.

-American students spend about 180 days a year in school.

-The original 13 American colonies opened The Boston Latin School, America’s first public school, in 1635.

-Early American schools didn’t teach subjects like reading or science; the early colonists wanted to teach their children more about family and community values.

teach their children more about family and community values. -If parents want their child to “get ahead,” or just to acclimate them to a social learning situation, enrolling their child in pre-school at about 3 or 4 years old is considered ideal.

-About 85% of current jobs in the U.S., and 90% of new ones, require some college or post-secondary education.

-Most experienced U.S. teachers agree that field trips can and should be an integral part of a student’s education.

-Most schools offer football (the American kind), basketball, wresting, tennis, volleyball, softball, and baseball.

-Students and teachers often joke with each other, and exchange high-fives in the hallways.

-There will be differences in grading scales, testing requirements, class structure, rules…pretty much everything state to state.

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